Category Archives: Esticadinho Nature

Sulphur flavissima on show and Notodontinae prominent in variety

Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava flavissima Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The spring passage of birds continues through Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire, with many migrants arriving and moving through over the last week. Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava flavissima are appearing in small number and are particularly evident on the reservoir walls, including this individual on April 22nd.

Streamer Anticlea derivata Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

But, there is a lot more to see besides the birds when walking around. Over the last few years, over 100 species of macro and micro moth have been recorded annually in the field. The 2017 list is well underway, with moths seen so far including this Streamer Anticlea derivata on a hide door on April 17th. More expected sightings have appeared in the form of Horse Chestnut Leaf Miner Cameraria ohridella on the wing from 16th and small numbers of Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana noted from the 15th.

Horse Chestnut Leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Esperia sulphurella Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The highlight of the week though was the site’s fifth Esperia sulphurella on the 17th. Widespread across the county, it was first recorded at Tophill in 2010 and this was the first since 2014.

Coxcomb Prominent Ptilodon capucina Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Lesser Swallow Prominent  Pheosia gnoma Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The appearance of species from the family Notodontinae show how quickly the year is progressing, with Coxcomb Prominent Ptilodon capucina, Lesser Swallow Prominent Pheosia gnoma and Swallow Prominent P. tremula all taken at light during the week.

Swallow Prominent Pheosia tremula Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Pebble Prominent Notodonta ziczac Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Pebble Prominent Notodonta ziczac and Pale Prominent Pterostoma palpina also appeared despite numbers caught and diversity being down due to cooler overnight temperatures.

Pale Prominent Pterostoma palpina Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The 10th site record of Tinea trinotella was noted on April 20th helping the moth 2017 moth list to healthy 50+ species by the 22nd.

Despite the Odonata season commencing on April 15th, Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula numbers remain low, with cool winds not helping the cause.

For the latest site news, check out the Tophill Low NR blog and twitter feed.

Plain, common, expected – April predictably surprises

Peacock Aglais io Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Warm temperatures during the latter part of the opening week of April encouraged a minimum of eight species of butterfly onto the wing at Tophill Low NR in East Yorkshire, including Peacock Aglais io and Comma Polygonia c-album, with the first Orange Tip Anthocharis cardamines noted from the 8th.

Comma Polygonia c-album Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Scarce Fungus Weevil Platyrhinus resinosus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Scarce Fungus Weevil Platyrhinus resinosus are sporadically recorded on site, but have become annual in recent years, so one on April 8th was not entirely unexpected – but seeing a day total of four, including these three together on single a Cramp Ball Daldinia concentrica was something of surprise – April 8th accounted for a good year of records for this species.

Scarce Fungus Weevil Platyrhinus resinosus on Daldinia concentrica Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Gymnocheta viridis Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The metallic green tachinid Gymnocheta viridis is often encountered on sunny days in the spring, while the mild temperatures of March and early April predictably encouraged Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula to take to the wing, with the first seen on April 15th – equalling the earliest ever Tophill date for this species set in 2012. The only previous early dates relative to this are April 16th 2011 and April 17th 2007.

Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Common Quaker Orthosia cerasi Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Orthosia season has proved to be a fantastic period for moth trapping. Over the period 1994-2016, a total of 472 Common Quaker O. cerasi were trapped at Tophill Low NR – the period March 11th-April 14th saw 498 taken at light. With only five individuals recorded between 2001-2016, Early Grey Xylocampa areola is considered a rare site species, but following the sixth ever Tophill record on March 13th, a further seven were trapped by mid-April, including three on the 3rd.

Early Grey Xylocampa areola Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Purple Thorn Selenia tetralunaria Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The first of the spring Purple Thorn Selenia tetralunaria was trapped on April 14th. The more plain, but incredibly site notable, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla on April 1st was only the ninth record since 1996, while Muslin Moth Diaphora mendica first trapped on April 5th followed by others in the month to date, suggest this species may be recorded more often than in previous years.

Muslin Moth Diaphora mendica Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

Kidney-spot ladybird Chilocorus renipustulatus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The April warmth has encouraged numerous Ladybird Coccinellidae to appear in the open, this one of many Kidney-spot Ladybird Chilocorus renipustulatus showing well at the minute, with one count including 23 on one tree early in the month. The scarcer site species Larch Ladybird Aphidecta obliterate was first seen on April 1st – pictures of this and others here on the blog written by Paul Ashton.

Little Egret Egretta garzetta Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

This full adult summer Little Egret Egretta garzetta on April 13th was amongst up to a minimum of 10 individuals seen on site this month. The Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis remained until the 15th at least, along with the Goosander Mergus merganser. A 1st summer Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus was at Watton NR on the 13th, while winter migrants continue to show, with Brambling Fringilla montifringilla present almost daily from the 3rd and a few winter thrushes Turdus in evidence.

Many summer migrants are now present, including Little-ringed Plover Charadrius dubius displaying on the southern marshes. As ever, for the latest site news, check out the Tophill blog and twitter feed.

Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire April 2017

The March into the main moth season

Hebrew Character Orthosia gothica Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

March proved fruitful with over 1300 moths recorded over the month at Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire. Orthosia season is in full swing, with Hebrew Character O. gothica featuring prominently in the daily records, while the 1000th Clouded Drab O. incerta in site history was trapped on March 17th.

Tawny Pinion Lithophane semibrunnea Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

This Tawny Pinion Lithophane semibrunnea was taken overnight on March 16th – the second site record, the only previous individual occurring in 2010. Agonopterix ocellana was a new addition to the site list on December 3rd 2016 – so it was something of surprise to catch three individuals over the March 28th-31st period, while a Parsnip Moth Depressaria radiella trapped overnight on the 31st was the ninth in site history.

The other highlights included Diamond-back Plutella xylostella on March 18th and a Pale Mottled Willow Caradrina clavipalpis on March 30th – the latter the 18th site record of this migrant species.

Agonopterix ocellana Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Early Thorn Selenia dentaria Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

A total of 16 Early Thorn Selenia dentaria is way higher than the Tophill average of seven individuals per annum over the last 20 years – 2016 was an unusual year with 20 trapped across both flight periods, while a Pine Beauty Panolis flammea on March 30th was only the 17th individual recorded since 1996.

Pine Beauty Panolis flammea Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Red Chestnut Cerastis rubricosa has been regular in small number almost annually at Tophill Low with 32 recorded over the 1996-2016 period – on the wing from March 12th, the 2017 total to date is 36!

Red Chestnut Cerastis rubricosa Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Water Carpet Lampropteryx suffumata Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

More regular fare has featured Water Carpet Lampropteryx suffumata, Small Quaker Orthosia cruda and Lead-coloured Drab Orthosia populeti.

Small Quaker Orthosia cruda Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Lead-coloured Drab Orthosia populeti Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

The unusual spring run of Acleris hastiana has continued, the one below one of the many variations of the species photographed by Doug Fairweather, which was taken for genitalia dissection on March 11th. On the same date, a specimen confirmed to be Acleris ferrugana on genitalia detail was taken at light – a species with less than 50 Yorkshire records since first recorded in 1998 (per Yorkshire Moths). Previously, only five A. ferrugana/notana agg. have been recorded on the site since 2012.

Acleris hastiana Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Birding wise, the spring migrants are arriving with Sand Martin Riparia riparia present in small numbers from March 17th, Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius from the 24th, and Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla and Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus arriving on March 30th .

The Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis remained on D reservoir until the month end, while a roosting Red Kite Milvus milvus on the 21st was presumably a migrant individual.

The gulls continued to generate interest with a 2nd summer male Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus displaying on the southern marshes late in the month, while the white-winged bonanza continued with Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus records involving a 2nd winter on March 18th and a 1st winter on the 19th and 20th – the bird on the 20th below pictured distantly on D reservoir wall.

Laridae Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

The latest news from Tophill Low NR can be found on the blog and twitter feed.

Tophill Low NR Gull roosting review 2016/2017

With the clocks going forward and the onset of British Summer Time, the curtain came down on the annual gull roosting season at Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire on March 25th.

A total of 10 species of gull were noted in the D reservoir roost, O reservoir roost and South Marsh East roost during the November 8th 2016-March 25th 2017 period with more than 100 roosts observed. This was down on the 2015-16 winter in which 11 species were recorded, while the 2014-15 winter campaign saw 12 species recorded.

The November/December 2016 period proved to be particularly uneventful, with just a single Yellow-legged Gull Larus michahellis, a minimum of six different Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus – including this adult below in December 2016 – with the lone highlight being a 1st calendar year Caspian Gull L. cachinnans on November 20th.

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire December 2016

However, the January-March 2017 period couldn’t have been more different!

Caspian Gull L. cachinnans the highlight – two 2nd calendar year individuals included this one photographed in poor light on January 7th on D reservoir.

Caspian Gull Larus cachinnans Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire January 2017

The Tophill averages for white-winged gulls since 1981 don’t make for fantastic reading – singles of either an Iceland L. glaucoides and/or Glaucous Gull L. hyperboreus tends to be a good year, anything more than that is a remarkable year. 

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

After a review of notes, photographs and videos (which is still ongoing) it would appear a minimum of 16 different Glaucous Gull L. hyperboreus appeared at Tophill Low NR between January 5th and March 25th – an incredible number – the one above on South Marsh East in February, the two below on January 14th – the first time ever two were present in the same roost according to reports dating back to 1981! (Please note I currently don’t have records prior to 1981 available)  Two were also seen in the D reservoir roost on March 8th, though not at the same time.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire January 2017

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Iceland Gull L. glaucoides also featured with a minimum of four seen during February, equalling the site annual record number of individuals – this total noted in both 1995 and 2001.

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Unusually, both Glaucous Gull L. hyperboreus and Iceland Gull L. glaucoides appeared together in the gull roosts on three dates this winter – the only time this had occurred previously at Tophill Low NR was on December 24th 2001.

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire January 2017

An influx of Common Gull L. canus and Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus in mid-January as a result of southeast winds predictably saw an influx of Mediterranean Gull I. melanocephalus from January 19th, with probably 30 different individuals recorded up until February 19th, with a further three in March, taking the winter total to a minimum of 39 individuals – slightly down on the estimated number of the previous two winters, but still a clear demonstration that the number of individuals is far higher than previously recorded. Once again the record total of six roosting was equalled on January 30th and February 2nd – but the total of seven individuals which moved through D reservoir on September 14th 2014 remains the highest day total ever.

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire January 2017

Predictably, Yellow-legged Gull L. michahellis were again scarce during the opening quarter of 2017 – a 3rd calendar year bird present on January 17th and a 2nd calendar year on February 20th and 22nd.

In summing up, while the target of 12 species in the winter roost wasn’t attained, the period January 5th-March 20th is actually the best ever period for scarcer large gulls in site history since construction in 1959 – the total of 20 white-winged gulls for a winter will stand the test of time and will probably be a long-standing site record. With all the white-winged gulls appearing in 2017, there is also the possibility that further individuals will be seen during this calendar year.

Scarce Tophill species just keep appearing

Early Grey Xylocampa areola Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

After a lacklustre start to the 2017 moth recording campaign at Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire, the opening half of March has proved rewarding, with site scarcities featuring prominently. An Early Grey Xylocampa areola on the 13th was only the sixth individual trapped on site since first appearing in 2001, while a Dotted Border Agriopis marginaria on the same date was the first record since 2012.

Tophill’s one and only Caloptilia elongella was recorded in 2013, so the second was long awaited, and came as something of a surprise on the 11th – and was later found to be a female following dissection. The variable Acleris hastiana in the past was only ever recorded during the late summer, but following several individuals trapped in the early part of 2016, the same has happened in 2017, with three taken at light since the start of the month, while Acrolepia autumnitella, a Yorkshire scarcity, has been noted in small numbers. Diurnea fagella, a spring species that can sometimes be found in good number during the day, was first found on the wing on the 15th. Few were discovered during last year’s flight period, but hopefully this year will be more productive for this species which first appeared at Tophill Low in 2011.

Caloptilia elongella Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Acleris hastiana Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

March began as February ended as the amazing run of white-winged gulls continued. A 1st or 2nd winter Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus was present around South Marsh East on the 1st. The west winds then abated, allowing further observation of D reservoir – and the theme continued with 1st winters on the 3rd, 6th, 7th and two on the 8th – making 4-6 individuals recorded over the first eight days of the month. Sadly, it didn’t continue – but there is still the chance that further individuals may appear in what has been an incredible period in Tophill’s long history.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Despite the daily turnover of gulls, Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus have proved short in supply this month with only four individuals seen on two dates.

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Two Red-crested Pochard Netta rufina appeared on the 3rd, joining the long-staying Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis on D reservoir, while a female Scaup Aythya marila was present on O reservoir on the 13th-14th.

Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyema Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Kingfisher Alcedo atthis Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

As the ever present Kingfisher Alcedo atthis put on a show, a Rock Pipit Anthus petrosus on O reservoir wall on the 16th was the highlight of the period – and only the site’s third since the turn of the century.

Rock Pipit Anthus petrosus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Rock Pipit Anthus petrosus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Rock Pipit Anthus petrosus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire March 2017

Absent in 2016, this Leocarpus fragilis – a Myxomycetes better known as a slime mould – was found in late February at the southern end.

Leocarpus fragilis Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Patch-watching always offers something – for the latest from Tophill Low NR, check out the blog and the twitter feed here.

Tophill’s February festival of white-winged laridae continued

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

The second half of February saw the white-winged gulls continue to appear at Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire with a 1st winter Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides present on the 15th. The following evening, either this individual or another appeared around D reservoir, before flying south – the 16th also seeing a 1st winter Glaucous Gull L. hyberboreus and a 1st winter Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus roost.

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Meanwhile, the second long-staying, or the original returning, female Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis remained on D reservoir, showing well at times from East Hide, the Russian White-fronted Geese Anser albifrons albifrons totalled 54 on both on the 16th and 18th, a Tundra Bean Goose A. serrirostris rossicus dropped onto D reservoir briefly on the 17th – a day which also saw the first returning Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus of the spring recorded.

Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Brisk westerly winds on the 20th required a change of gull roosting plan. The usual winter haunt to view D reservoir becomes unusable in these conditions, and alternative viewing options over D reservoir were also unusable due to the weather conditions.

Historically, gull roosting at the southern end of the site is rarely productive. Few birds roost on O reservoir, and many vacate the water body either at, or after, last light – some heading south, some north to D reservoir, and some drop on to South Marsh East.

Predictably, between the 20th and 28th – no gulls were present on O reservoir at last light, and none were there in the several hours before last light.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

South Marsh East on the other hand saw a 1st winter Glaucous Gull L. hyberboreus roost on the 20th and 22nd, alongside a 1st winter Yellow-legged Gull L. michahellis on the same dates, amongst the roosting Great Black-backed Gull L. marinus.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

An adult or sub adult Iceland Gull L. glaucoides circled the southern marshes late on the 23rd, and a 1st winter roosted on both the 25th and 26th, the latter date seeing another 1st winter Glaucous Gull L. hyberboreus roost. Another or the same, it’ll never be known as it was too dark to photograph.

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

A 2nd winter Iceland Gull L. glaucoides was present early evening on the 28th, but the birds took flight at last light, possibly an Otter Lutra lutra or American Mink Neovison vison in the marsh causing them to ‘spook‘ and depart southwards.

Everyone who visits Tophill NR, East Yorkshire will have their own memories of great periods or eras since the site’s creation in 1959. In site statistics, the 55 days from January 5th-February 28th has proved to best period ever for white-winged gulls, with 11-13 individual Glaucous Gull L. hyberboreus and 4-6 Iceland Gull L. glaucoides recorded – this being more typical of a decade’s worth of sightings for these two species according to historical records. There is still time to add more in the next few weeks, ahead of the second winter period beginning in late October. Regardless of further records, and given Tophill’s long 58 year history – 2017 will be the labelled Tophill’s best white-wing year for a very long period of time.

Not only gulls, but a Goosander Mergus merganser and almost 100 Mute Swan Cygnus olor roost nightly, with the smaller numbers of Greylag Geese Anser anser, odd Russian White-fronted A. a. albifrons and Pink-footed Geese A. brachyrhynchus, up to 20 Shelduck Tadorna tadorna, while Curlew Numenius arquata sometimes pre-roost before heading presumably to Watton NR for the night.

As ever, for the latest news from Tophill Low NR, check out the blog and twitter feed.

Curlew Numenius arquata Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Scarlet Elf Cup Sarcoscypha coccinea Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

The expected carpet of Scarlet Elf Cup Sacroscypha coccinea traditionally provides a delightful sight in the woodland with early 2017 proving to be no different to past years, and it is fantastic to see it appearing in different areas of the site.

Early season moth trapping has proved slow, only Pale Brindled Beauty Phigalia pilosaria recorded in any number at light, with occasional Chestnut Conistra vaccinii and March Moth Alsophila aescularia.

Pale Brindled Beauty Phigalia pilosaria Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

February ansers to the Glaucous Gull bonanza

The birds continue to arrive at Tophill Low NR in East Yorkshire, with February 4th seeing an arrival of geese in the form of 32 Russian White-fronted Geese Anser albifrons albifrons and 9 Tundra Bean Geese A. serrirostris rossicus with several Pink-footed Geese A. brachyrhynchus also in attendance amongst the large Greylag A. anser flock.

Tundra Bean Goose Anser serrirostris rossicus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Add in the long-staying redhead Smew Mergellus albellus, a Goosander Mergus merganser  and probably a second Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis of the winter which appeared on the 5th, remaining until the 11th at least, Tophill is full of diversity. The Russian White-fronted Geese A. a. albifrons remained until the 10th at least, peaking at 34 on the 7th, though not all the flock proved to be visible at all times, and the Greylag A. anser flock fragmented from the 5th.

In keeping with Tophill Laridae history, the Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus seen on February 3rd predictably failed to reappear on the 4th. Still, it is the best year in site history!

So it came as something of a surprise when a 1st winter dropped onto D reservoir mid-afternoon on the 5th to the delight of many. A different one to the individual seen on the 3rd. It showed well for 30 minutes before flying east.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus Tophill Low NR February 2017

Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus Tophill Low NR February 2017

Site history is history… the statistics show patterns – one that jumps out is the maximum of 16 individuals recorded 1981-2010. So, already an unprecedented year for this species with 6, more likely 7 individuals recorded since the turn of the year. Almost half the total recorded in 29 years.

Mid-afternoon on the 10th, another 1st winter appeared on the reservoir in between the sleet and snow showers showing well for an hour, before disappearing around 4pm as conditions proved impossible to observe in, and was not seen again before darkness fell.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus Tophill Low NR February 2017

Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus Tophill Low NR February 2017

Glaucous Gull Larus hyberboreus Tophill Low NR February 2017

In keeping with Tophill history, this bird didn’t appear on the 11th – but another 1st winter did late on in the day, appearing smaller than the previous nights individual, especially in flight. Two in two nights… maybe 9 different individuals.

Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

So on the afternoon of the 12th, could a brilliant year continue??? What appears to be another 1st winter dropped onto the reservoir late afternoon. No photos are available but the video taken seems to show it having a much larger, wider head compared to the birds on the 10th and 11th, with the colouration different to the bird on the 10th. Incredibly, this is probably the 10th individual since January 5th.

Tophill is a transit roost, there is no pattern to it, other than birds appear one night and gone the next, particularly the large Larids. Even if looked at conservatively, it is probably 8-10 individuals – the best year in Tophill history for this species since the reservoirs were built in 1959.

An immature Iceland Gull L. glaucoides also attended the roost in near darkness on the 12th – the last time both Iceland L. glaucoides and Glaucous L. hyberboreus were on D reservoir on the same evening was December 24th 2001. Another incredible day in Tophill’s long history.

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus numbers dropped off between the 4th-12th, but several birds were present in the week, including the adult above and this small 1st winter below.

Mediterranean Gull Ichthyaetus melanocephalus Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire February 2017

An adult Yellow-legged Gull L. michahellis roosted on the 9th – meaning nine species were recorded in a week.  The Tophill test is 12 species of gull in a winter, but it is expected in a calendar year – 10 species have been recorded between January 7th and February 12th!!!

Disappointingly, the moth trapping season continues to be slow, with nothing taken at light so far in 2017, but careful searching has yielded several species in small number including Acrolepia autumnitella.

The fungi list continues to grow. Mycena flavoalba was new for the site list in January, photographed by Doug Fairweather who also discovered Resupinatus trichotis – another addition to the Tophill list.

Mycena flavoalba Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire January 2017

Resupinatus trichotis Tophill Low NR, East Yorkshire January 2017

For the latest from Tophill Low NR, check out the blog and twitter feed.